AIMS-RN Executive Committee

Prof. Denise Fitzgerald

Prof. Denise Fitzgerald

Key words:
Demyelination / Remyelination
/ T cells

Our Regenerative Neuroimmunology research group are interested in the role of the adaptive immune system and in particular T cells, in both myelin damage and regeneration in the central nervous system. Our goal is to make new biological discoveries to help develop new treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other demyelinating conditions.

Our expertise:

  • T cell biology

  • In vitro cultures of immune cells and glial cells

  • Ex vivo CNS slice cultures

  • In vivo models of demyelination and remyelination

  • MS tissue neuropathology (Dame Ingrid Allen Tissue Bank)

Dr Una Fitzgerald

Dr Una FitzGerald

Key words:
Myelin / ER stress /
MS pathology

Our main research goal is to investigate the pathological processes occurring during multiple sclerosis (MS) with the aim of developing novel approaches to treating progressive MS. We have completed many post-mortem MS tissue, pre-clinical and ex vivo studies, investigating endoplasmic reticulum stress signalling and modelling various aspects of disease pathology.   Our current major focus is the progressive phase of MS.

Our expertise:

  • Post-mortem MS tissue analysis

  • Brain cell lines

  • Murine mix glial cell culture models

  • Human iPSC-derived cell lines

  • Ex vivo brain slice culture models

  • Biomarker biology

Dr. Yvonne Dombrowski

Dr. Yvonne Dombrowski

Key words:
Inflammasome / Innate
Immune System / Myelin

Our research interest focuses on innate immune mechanisms in myelin damage and repair in MS. In particular, we are interested in understanding the role of inflammasomes and downstream signaling in myelin damage and regeneration in MS with the aim to identify key immune mechanisms that can be therapeutically targeted to promote remyelination.

Our expertise:

  • In vitro glial cell culture,

  • Ex vivo cerebellar slice culture

  • In vivo models of de- and remyelination

Dr. Jill McMahon

Dr. Jill McMahon

Key words:
Myelin / ER stress /
Neuropathology / MS pathology

My research interests are focused on neuroscience and neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and mild-traumatic brain injury. My main aim is to elucidate how endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response influence glial cell differentiation and death, and therefore MS progression and demyelination.

Expertise & techniques:

  • Neurohistological techniques

  • Analysis of neuropathological changes in human and animal CNS tissue

  • Cell culture of mixed glial cells and murine and human cell lines

  • In vivo models of mild traumatic brain injury

  • Gene and cell therapy using viral and non-viral vectors

  • Biomarker biology

  • MS tissue neuropathology (Dame Ingrid Allen Tissue Bank)

Dr. Hugh Kearney

Dr. Eric Downer
– Trinity College Dublin

Clinical Senior Lecturer, Clinical Medicine

Dr. Rebecca Maguire
– NUI Maynooth

Dr Jennifer Dowling
- RCSI

Jennifer is a Lecturer in Immunology and Biotherapeutics in the School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). Dr Dowling is also Principal Investigator and leads the Brain inflammation Group Ireland (BIGie). Jennifer’s lab is working to understand macrophage biology and particularly NeuroImmune interactions in the CNS and their influence on neurological outcomes of injury and disease. Dr Dowling is a council member of Neuroscience Ireland.

Our research interests are focused on NeuroImmune interactions and their influence on neurological outcomes of injury and disease. We have a particular interest in multiple sclerosis (MS) and Epilepsy. Our main aim in our work in MS is to elucidate how targeting microRNAs and the inflammatory status of glial cells can influence MS progression and demyelination. Our ultimate goal is to target these pathways in order to promote the remyelination and repair of neurons in MS.

Our expertise:

In vitro glial cell culture

Ex vivo brain slice culture

Ex vivo models of de- and remyelination

microRNAs and macrophage polarisation